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Kinmen welcomes Chinese investment on tourism industry


June 2nd, 2010 by Formosa Medical Travel

From http://focustaiwan.tw/ShowNews/WebNews_Detail.aspx?ID=201005290007&Type=aECO


Kinmen, May 29 (CNA) The Kinmen County government said Saturday that it welcomes a partly Chinese-funded joint venture that will build a resort and shopping center on the island of Kinmen.

The Investment Commission under the Ministry of Economic Affairs approved the project on Thursday, in which a Chinese company from Fujian Province plans to invest about NT$50 million (US$1.56 million) to set up a company with a Taiwanese partner on the offshore island.

The joint venture — which will be 49 percent owned by the Fujian-based company and 51 percent by the Taiwanese side — will be the first time a Chinese company has invested in Taiwan’s tourism industry.

Hsiao Yung-ping, an official at the Kinmen Industrial Development and Investment Promotion Commission, said that the company is eying the increased number of tourists traveling via the direct transport links between the Chinese city of Xiamen and the Taiwanese islands of Kinmen and Matsu — the so-called “mini-three-links.” Kinmen County’s efforts to make itself an island of medical tourism and leisure travel also provide a lot of business opportunities, he added.

Hsiao said that Kinmen County offers various investment incentives and will provide assistance to companies in need. (By Ni Kuo-yen and Fanny Liu)



European medical travel industry issues “Declaration of Venice”


May 15th, 2010 by Formosa Medical Travel

In one of the key outcomes of the European Medical Travel Conference 2010 in Monastier, Italy, the European medical travel industry has announced the issuance of the “Declaration of Venice,” calling on industry and government actors to cooperate and work together to help grow the medical travel industry.

The Declaration calls on providers to recognize the “right of citizens to travel for the purpose to receive access to or better healthcare services,” the “need for global health systems to respond better to the needs of increasingly mobile citizens,” and the necessity of “integrat[ing] better health and tourism services” through greater investment.

The Declaration was intended, in part, to reaffirm the rights of European citizens to travel throughout Europe and the world to receive the best possible medical care at affordable prices. The document stresses cooperation between all levels of the sector, including public tourism agencies, government actors, and healthcare providers.

Contributors to the declaration hope that the document’s publication will help impress upon European politicians that the medical tourism industry is here to stay, and that it will encourage all players in the medical tourism industry to strive for greater value, safety, access, and quality in medical tourism.



Dallas Morning News blog reports on medical tourism in Taiwan


February 16th, 2010 by Formosa Medical Travel

Murli Melwani, guest blogging for the Dallas Morning News, praises Taiwan’s abilities in medical tourism:

Have you wondered why even affluent Americans have become medical tourists? According to the Deloitte Center for Health Care Solutions, 750,000 Americans travelled abroad for medical care in 2007. The Center projects that the figure will cross 1.6 million by 2012. …


An important reason why medical dollars go overseas is the status and the approach of doctors in the U.S. I will explain this in terms of my experience with doctors in Taiwan, where I lived for 25 years.


Most of the doctors in Taiwan are trained in the U.S. When they return to home, they do not open their own clinics. They work for Medical University hospitals, hospitals founded by American missionaries, those set up by philanthropic Taiwanese or in government hospitals. Their status: they are employees and they earn a salary.


What is important is the approach of these doctors, which is clinical rather than analytical. The clinical approach is deductive in nature and the doctor draws on his experience and knowledge of symptoms in arriving at his diagnosis. The analytical approach uses the results of tests to draw conclusions.


By contrast, says Melwani, doctors in the United States often order unnecessary treatments and tests, in order to recover their investment in hospital equipment and technology. Melwani recommends that American doctors return to a style more similar to that of Taiwan, where treatment is dictated by need instead of money.



Experts encourage Britain’s NHS to consider medical tourism


January 16th, 2010 by Formosa Medical Travel

The British newspaper The Independent reports that Britain’s National Health Service could save millions if the Department of Health considered utilizing medical tourism. “Thousands of patients waiting for operations such as hip replacements and hernia repairs could be treated more cheaply and quickly if the Government set up formal agreements” with medical tourism destinations, the report says.


Currently, the publicly-funded health service provides healthcare to all residents free 0f charge, but there has been criticism surrounding the wait times for many elective procedures. The Independent article argues that these wait times could be reduced through medical tourism, while saving a significant amount of money.


“At least £120m could be saved,” says the article, “if NHS patients currently waiting for just five different operations went to India, with a companion, for treatment in an accredited hospital, according to health economists’ calculations.” India is one of many medical tourism destinations, many of which provide a quality of healthcare equal to or better than that in Britain, say experts.


Hundreds of thousands of people are already taking advantage of medical tourism on their own. Britons make up a large portion of medical tourists, as do uninsured Americans who cannot afford the high cost of many medical treatments in the United States. “The estimated number of medical tourists worldwide each year ranges from four million to 617 million,” says the Independent.


In the coming years, many expect that governments around the world will start to consider medical tourism as a solution to rising medical costs and wait lists. Developing countries such as India, Thailand, and Mexico, as well as highly-developed countries such as Singapore and Taiwan can provide many medical procedures for a fraction of the cost in Britain and the United States. As populations continue to age in western countries, many expect medical tourism to experience tremendous growth.



Arthritis and Medical Tourism


January 6th, 2010 by Formosa Medical Travel

Osteoarthritis, the most common cause of knee and hip pain, afflicts an estimated 40 million Americans.  With the population of the United States aging every day, many predict that osteoarthritis will afflict as many as one out of every five Americans by the end of the decade.


Osteoarthritis causes the degeneration of the cartilage in both the knee and hip joints, causing those afflicted to experience severe pain and decreased mobility. While the condition is not life-threatening, it does have severe implications for the quality of life of those who suffer from osteoarthritis. If the condition is allowed to progress to an advanced stage, patients can find themselves very limited in their daily activities.


The only long-term solution to osteoarthritis of the knee or hip is total joint replacement surgery. Artificial joints can replace the deteriorated cartilage, and allow patients to return to their normal lives, usually with greatly increased mobility and reduced pain. Unfortunately, total joint replacement surgery is a costly procedure, especially in the United States. Patients without health insurance can expect to pay upward of $45,000 for a single knee or hip replacement surgery in the United States.


For Americans who cannot afford the cost of knee replacement or hip replacement surgery, there are options. Medical tourism, the practice of leaving one’s country for medical care, can offer patients significant savings. Many countries offer joint replacement surgery for a fraction of the cost of the same procedure in the United States. In Taiwan, both knee replacement surgery and hip replacement surgery can be obtained for under $12,000, at world-class hospitals accredited by the Joint Commission International.



Health Tourism Increasingly Popular in Asia


December 22nd, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

‘Health Tourism’ Increasingly Popular in Asia

Medical tourism brought in $1 billion in 2007 and that is expected to triple by 2012, when the Health Ministry expects more than two million medical tourists.


From VoaNews


Asia is being seen as a growth center in the globalization of health services thanks to rising demand from developed countries as well as the region’s expanding middle class. But there are concerns that so-called medical tourism will shift resources away from public to private health care systems.


Over much of the past 10 years Thailand has led the growing medical tourism market, as foreigners sought lower cost health services and ready access to treatment.


The services available range from complicated cardiac surgery, to cosmetic surgery to dentistry and even alternative care, such as Chinese medicine, yoga and traditional Ayurvedic treatments.


Rising international travel and the availability of information on the Internet have boosted the number of travelers seeking treatment.


In Thailand, as many as 1.4 million visitors arrived seeking medical care in 2007, the most recent year numbers are available – up from half a million in 2001. Medical tourism brought in $1 billion in 2007 and that is expected to triple by 2012, when the Health Ministry expects more than two million medical tourists.


The largest numbers come from the European Union, followed by the Middle East and the United States.


Kenneth Mays, international marketing director for Bumrungrad International Hospital in Bangkok, says the high standard of care has been a drawing card.


“Thailand offers a very ideal combination of medical quality and service quality. There are both private and public hospitals and it’s very consumer driven because most people pay for their own medical care. Americans will come here because its 60 to 80 percent less expensive for equivalent treatment,” said Mays.


But Thailand faces growing competition as more countries invest in medical services. Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea and the Philippines are all promoting medical tourism.


Ruben Toral, chief executive officer of health industry consulting firm Medeguide, says more people will weigh low cost against quality guarantees when choosing destinations for treatment.


“You will pay for Singapore but you absolutely know what you will be getting. If you want absolute guarantees, you go to Singapore. If you want absolute price, you go to India. Thailand and Malaysia right now represent the value plays – good quality, great service, good product,” said Toral.


He says medical tourism is likely to grow.


“Asia will be and will continue to be the dominant force in medical tourism. Why? Because this is where you find number one the world’s biggest chunk of population – really between India and China there you have it, two-thirds the population just settled in this area. And this is also where you have a major emerging middle-class market,” he said.


Toral says that aging patients from North America, Europe, Australia and Japan also will look for places with plenty of access to low-cost care.


But there are concerns that increased investment in medical services for the wealthy will draw resources from the region’s public hospitals.


Critics say many public health facilities already are under strain and fear more professionals will abandon the public system for private practice.


Viroj Na Ranong, an economist with the Thailand Development Research Institute, a policy research agency, fears that shift is under way.


“When you compare the purchasing power – the foreign purchasing power would be much higher than the middle-class or upper-class purchasing power in Thailand. This is a fundamental issue whenever there is a burst of foreign patients then the doctor would be drawn to the private sector,” said Viroj Na Ranong.


Thailand’s National Health Commission reports that scores of medical specialists have moved from the state system to private health care.


The National Institute of Development Administration says medical tourism has exacerbated shortages of physicians, dentists and nursing staff in public facilities.


But Bumrungrad’s Mays doubts those claims.


“It doesn’t hold up to serious mathematics because Thailand sees about 1.4 million medical travelers from outside. That is a fraction of the total visits to doctors and admits [admissions] from Thais themselves,” said Mays. “It’s very important to the country’s economy and has a lot of advantages to the country – but we don’t think it’s taking a lion’s share of resources or too many resources from Thais themselves.”


May says that due to expanding private health care in Thailand – and limits on foreign doctors working in the country – there has been a reverse brain drain; Thai medical workers employed overseas are returning home.


Other medical professionals say many work part-time at private hospitals and also serve in public hospitals.


Several medical industry analysts say Asia’s rising economic strength and increasing investment in health services will be able to meet demand for affordable care both for people in the region and for world travelers.



Transparency in medical pricing


December 22nd, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

One of the draws of medical tourism – alongside low costs and high quality care – is the transparency in pricing. In many cases in the United States, patients find it nearly impossible to get an accurate price quote before undergoing treatment. In many cases, hospitals in the United States offer different prices to patients with health insurance than the prices offered uninsured patients. Because of this, many hospitals are unwilling to provide a transparent pricing scheme. Oftentimes, insurance companies forge agreements with hospitals to charge patients a certain price within a certain “physician network,” and an entirely different price if patients choose a surgeon outside of the network. Uninsured patients often have to go into treatment without knowing what they will see on the final bill.


Overseas hospitals, including those in medical tourism destinations such as Taiwan, are much more transparent in their pricing plans. Patients are always provided with an itemized bill – which includes every single item the patient is expected to pay for, including medication, food, surgeon fees, and ward fees. The price quoted in the initial estimate is almost always the price paid after care is administered – except in cases where further treatment is required.


The hospitals in Formosa Medical Travel’s network offer all-inclusive knee and hip replacement packages, which include the price of treatment as well as accommodation and all other necessary expenditures. Patients who arrange surgery through Formosa Medical Travel will pay the exact rate they are quoted, and are provided with a fully-itemized bill.



Hip Replacement Cost


December 20th, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

Hip Replacement Cost Analysis


The United States has among the highest costs in the world for hip replacement surgery. An American with no health insurance can expect to pay upwards of $45,000 at a typical hospital. Those with insurance will, barring a few exceptions, be covered by their provider. However, out-of-pocket expenses can still be costly for those who have health insurance. Patients with Medicare are eligible for hip replacement surgery.


For American patients without health insurance, it is worth considering medical tourism – leaving the country for hip replacement surgery. Many countries in the world offer hip replacement procedures for costs dramatically lower than those in the United States. We have listed hip replacement cost estimates for various medical tourism destinations, as well as the United States, in the chart below. The cost of total hip replacement surgery will also vary from patient to patient, depending on factors such as age and medical history.

 

Hip Replacement Cost
Price Estimates

United States:$50,0800-$65,000
Singapore: $17,000-$23,000
Thailand: $15,500-$17,500
Taiwan: $8,000 – $13,000
India $8,000 – $12,200

 

 

 

 

Formosa Medical Travel works on behalf of patients seeking affordable knee and hip replacement surgery in Taiwan. As one of the world’s most developed countries, with a healthcare system ranked among the best, English-speaking doctors, no visa requirement, and some of the lowest surgical prices in the world, Taiwan has emerged as one of the most popular destinations for Americans seeking low-cost hip replacement surgery.


At Formosa Medical Travel, there is no charge for our services, and your procedure is fully insurable against complications through a US Insurer. Most of the hospitals in our network have been accredited by Joint Commission International (JCI). These world-class facilities provide outstanding care at rates far lower than those in the United States. We will book your surgery, transfer medical records, assist in finding your flight and hotel, and we’ll be there at the airport when you arrive, all at no cost to you.



Formosa Medical Travel Promotes Taiwan as a World-Class Medical Tourism Destination for Americans, TAITRA Announces


November 30th, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

TAIPEI, Taiwan– Marking another step in the development of Taiwan’s medical tourism industry, TAITRA announces Formosa Medical Travel, the first American-owned and operated medical tourism agency offering service in Taiwan.

“We believe that this is a great step in the emergence of Taiwan as a premier medical tourism destination,” said TAITRA. “Formosa Medical Travel has entered into agreements with three of Taiwan’s major hospitals this year, including Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, and Changhua Christian Hospital. With their comprehensive website and premium level of service, Formosa Medical Travel offers patients an easy way to take advantage of the first-rate, affordable medical care offered in Taiwan.”

Taiwan’s healthcare system has long been praised as one of the most efficient in the world, with administrative costs below two percent. “While the debate over healthcare reform in the United States continues, the costs of medical care in Taiwan remain among the lowest in the world,” said Don Gilliland, Chief Operating Officer of Formosa Medical Travel. “For example, the price of total knee replacement surgery at a JCI-accredited hospital in Taiwan, including all surgical costs, VIP accommodations, concierge service, transportation, and round-trip airfare, is generally less than $15,000, while the price in the United States is often upwards of $60,000.”

Medical tourism has surged in recent years, as an increasing number of Americans are turning to lower-cost healthcare overseas as a way to save on medical bills. “Medical tourism is also drawing the attention of self-insured employers and small business owners,” said Gilliland, “because it is an effective way to reduce healthcare costs while still offering first-rate medical care to employees.”

Formosa Medical Travel’s website, FormosaMedicalTravel.com, offers patients a simple and comprehensive way to review doctors’ resumes and credentials, hospital accreditations and surgery prices, as well as frequently asked questions and a detailed explanation of procedures. With a simple three-step approach, Formosa Medical Travel assists patients in every step of the medical travel process, from start to finish.

About Formosa Medical Travel

Formosa Medical Travel, an American-owned and operated medical tourism company based in Taipei, works on behalf of American patients seeking high-quality medical care at affordable prices, connecting them with a network of world-class hospitals located in Taiwan. As a full-service medical tourism company, Formosa Medical Travel assists patients in all aspects of the process, from booking surgery and transferring medical records, to assistance in finding air travel and providing personalized concierge service. There is no charge to the patient for these services. To learn more, visit http://FormosaMedicalTravel.com.

About TAITRA

Founded in 1970 to help promote foreign trade, the Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA) is the foremost non-profit trade promotion organization in Taiwan. Jointly sponsored by the government, industry associations, and several commercial organizations, TAITRA assists Taiwan businesses and manufacturers with reinforcing their international competitiveness and in coping with the challenges they face in foreign markets.

TAITRA boasts a well-coordinated trade promotion and information network of over 600 trained specialists stationed at its Taipei headquarters, four local branch offices in Hsinchu, Taichung, Tainan and Kaohsiung, and over 48 overseas branch offices worldwide. TAITRA’s Service Industry Promotion Center was inaugurated in July 2006 to facilitate the globalization of Taiwan’s burgeoning service industry.



Medical tourism cost comparison


November 29th, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

As a medical tourism destination, Taiwan offers significant savings over the United States for many medical procedures. With the latest technology, state-of-the-art equipment, and medical centers that rival the finest hotels, Taiwan offers a medical tourism experience that is unparalleled in the world. Patients can expect to experience savings as high as 80% for many procedures – even after the cost of airfare.



Cost comparison for major procedures

medical tourism cost comparison


The prices shown here are only estimates, and will vary from patient-to-patient. Formosa Medical Travel offers single knee replacement surgery, single hip replacement surgery, double knee replacement surgery, and double hip replacement surgery in Taiwan for costs dramatically lower than those in the United States.



Medical Tourism Group From Mainland China Visits Taiwan


November 19th, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

On November 16th 2009,  a group of 30 Mainland Chinese arrived for a 9 day medical tourism trip in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.  The medical tourists received a number of different procedures, including dental, skin, eye and cosmetic surgery. There were also a number of Chinese medicine treatments.


The secretary general of the Kaohsiung Medical Tourism Promotion Association noted that Kaohsiung has an edge over Taipei because of lower prices and more tourism opportunities.


Taiwan is an up-and-coming player in the medical tourism industry. Many of the short-term opportunities are right in Taiwan’s geographic back yard. However, whether or not large numbers of Chinese citizens will leave the mainland for Taiwan in search of medical care remains to be seen.



Medical tourism to experience resurgence, says Deloitte


November 11th, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

In a new report, the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions projects medical tourism to rebound strongly from the effects of the economic recession in coming years.


The report, entitled “Medical Tourism: Update and Implications”, says that while outbound medical travel from the United States fell by nearly 14% between 2007 and 2009 as a result of the recession, it is predicted to show a strong resurgence as economic conditions improve. The number of outbound medical travelers could be as much as 5 million per year by 2017, the report suggests, if the industry continues to grow at the expected rate of 35% per year.


Paul H. Keckley, executive director of the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions,  expects outbound medical tourism to continue its rapid growth despite the efforts at healthcare reform in the United States. “There is nothing in current health reform bills that decelerates the cost of care,” said Keckley, “so that contributes to the appetite that people have.”


Healthcare costs will continue to rise by six percent per year for the next decade, the report says, making medical tourism an increasingly attractive option for the aging US population. With medical tourism “offering savings of up to 70 percent after travel expenses, we anticipate that the industry will recover from the current economic downturn,” said Heckley.  ”Medical tourism represents an important option for patient populations who need care but lack adequate out-of-pocket funds to afford a procedure in the U.S., or those who seek lower prices for purposes of savings.”

Medical tourism represents an important option for patient populations who need care but lack
adequate out-of-pocket funds to afford a procedure in the U.S., or those who seek lower prices
for purposes of savings.


International Medical Services Industry Forum 2009


November 9th, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

On Thursday, November 6th,  the International Medical Services Industry Forum 2009 was held at the World Trade Center in Taipei, Taiwan. Representatives from a number of different countries were in attendance at the event, which was sponsored by the Taiwan External Trade Development Council ( TAITRA).


The opening remarks were made by speakers from the Bureau of Foreign Trade, the Ministry of Economic Affairs, the Department of Health, and the Executive Yuan. The first keynote speech centered on the development of cardiac care in Taiwan, with a case study of Cheng Hsin General Hospital by Dr. Jeng Wei, the director of the heart center at Cheng Hsin. The second speech addressed the competitive advantages of plastic surgery in Taiwan, and was given by Dr. Yuen-Bih Tang, the director of plastic surgery at National Taiwan University Hospital.


After a short break, Dr. Gan Se Khem, the executive chairman of Health Management International gave an excellent speech on the strategic marketing of medical tourism in Asia. Finally, Dr. William Shwetzer from Tao Garden Health Spa and Resort gave a presentation on the integrative medical resort in Thailand.


The four-hour conference was very informative and well-attended. Formosa Medical Travel representatives were in attendance to answer questions presented by the hospitals and clinics that were present, as well as address the emergence of the American medical tourism market in Taiwan.



Knee Replacement Alternatives


November 3rd, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

Knee Replacement Alternatives

There are a number of alternatives to knee replacement surgery that sufferers of osteoarthritis should consider before getting a total knee replacement. As the cost of knee replacement surgery increases in the United States, many people are exploring new methods for arthritis relief.

 

Most knee replacement alternatives focus on limiting pain, rather than treating the cause. Some options include anti-inflammatory medications, lifestyle changes, and other treatments – which can often reduce the pain caused by osteoarthritis, and delay the need for a knee replacement. In the intermediate stages of osteoarthritis, many patients are given joint fluid therapy, also known as “chicken shots” or “rooster juice“.  Chicken shots for knee pain relief are a currently a very popular alternative to total knee replacement surgery.

 

Cortisone shots and Synvisc injections are also often succesful in limiting knee pain in the short term. However, in many cases, patients who are seeking a long-term solution to osteoarthritis should consider surgical treatment.

 

Before getting total knee replacement surgery, consult your doctor about some of these less-expensive alternatives.



Healthcare Reform in the United States May Actually Increase Medical Tourism


October 13th, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

More medical tourists may also contribute to further globalization of lab testing

Medical tourism continues to be a force with the potential to exert significant influence on healthcare in the United States. For that reason, experts have weighed in recently on how efforts to reform healthcare may either inhibit or encourage growth in the number of Americans opting to become medical tourists.

Just as medical tourism has the potential to be transformative to certain aspects of healthcare here in this country, Dark Daily believes that medical tourism may also encourage greater globalization of pathology services and clinical laboratory testing. For both reasons, pathologists and clinical laboratory managers will find recent commentary to be enlightening…

Read Full Article

Article courtesy of DarkDaily.com



Asian Medical Tourism Market to Post Double Digit Growth Rate


October 12th, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

PRLog (Press Release) – Oct 12, 2009 – High cost of treatments in developed countries is proving beneficial for medical tourism market in Asia. Resultantly, the region has emerged as one of the fastest growing medical tourism destinations worldwide. According to our new research study “Asian Medical Tourism Analysis (2008-2012)” the Asian medical tourism market is projected to grow at a CAGR of around 14% during 2009-2012.


We have done an extensive research and analysis of both current and past market trends at country level to give qualitative information of the Asian medical tourism industry’s progress over the past few years. Analysis has been done of all major markets like India, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, South Korea and the Philippines.


According to our research, Thailand and Singapore are dominating the market and this trend is expected to continue in future as well. The research also highlights the reasons that are driving growth in these markets, along with roadblocks before the industry.


Going ahead, our research also studies the market on types of treatments and surgeries sought by foreign medical tourists. After thorough evaluation, we have found that most of patients come for high cost surgery like Orthopedic, Cardio, and cosmetic surgery. In this segment, our research provides detailed information and analysis of number of tourist arrivals, cost analysis of different treatments and other demographics. The report gives comprehensive information about target country level market which will help clients in defining and planning their market strategy in a better way.


“Asian Medical Tourism Analysis (2008-2012)” also provides information of key competitors in the market along with their business information and areas of expertise. This will give client an additional edge over other competitors in the market. Overall, our research study provides valuable information to clients looking to venture into these markets and helps them to devise strategies while going for an investment/partnership in these markets.


Source: http://prlog.org/10372230



Formosa Medical Travel Adds Three of Taiwan’s Leading Hospitals to Medical Tourism Network


October 2nd, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

TAIPEI, Taiwan– Formosa Medical Travel, a medical tourism facilitation company headquartered in Taipei, has entered into agreements with three of Taiwan’s leading hospitals, with the assistance of the Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA). Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, and Changhua Christian Hospital are the three newest members of Formosa Medical Travel’s network.

 

“We believe that Taiwan is destined to develop into one of the leading countries in Asia’s medical tourism market,” said Tom Griffith, Executive Vice President of Formosa Medical Travel. “The quality of medical care in Taiwan has long been lauded for its efficiency and modernity, and these three facilities stand at the forefront. We know that medical travelers will find Taiwan to be a very accessible, highly-developed country, and these world-class facilities reflect a healthcare system that ranks among the finest in the world. We are thrilled to form a relationship with these world-class facilities and their medical teams.” With this expansion of its network, Formosa Medical Travel has increased the options available to patients seeking low-cost solutions in medical tourism.

 

Among Americans, medical tourism has experienced rapid growth in recent years, as an increasing number of patients seek alternatives to high costs in the United States. Taiwan provides one of the appealing options in travel, with internationally-accredited hospitals, world-class healthcare professionals, the latest in medical technology, and friendly, patient-oriented services. Taiwan’s highly-developed medical infrastructure, combined with its low administrative costs and efficient service, has allowed it to offer medical procedures at costs competitive with the world’s most popular medical travel destinations.

 

“Our hospital was accredited last year by Joint Commission International, an international branch of JACHO, U.S.A. FORMOSA has visited us many times and were very impressed by the high quality and reasonable cost of our joint replacement procedure,” said Jui-Lung Tung, Vice Superintendent (Administration) of Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital. Show Chwan Memorial Hospital and Changhua Christian Hospital also expressed their high expectation about the collaboration. They believe this not only marks another step in the emergence of Taiwan as a premier destination in medical tourism, but also proves the high quality of Taiwan’s medical service.

 

About Formosa Medical Travel

 

Formosa Medical Travel works on behalf of patients seeking affordable knee and hip replacement surgery abroad, connecting them with a network of world-class hospitals located in Taiwan. These facilities provide outstanding medical care while offering patients significant savings. Formosa Medical Travel books patients’ surgery, transfers medical records, assists in finding flights and hotels, and provides concierge services to customers in Taiwan. There is no charge to the patient for these services. To learn more, visit Formosa Medical Travel

 

About TAITRA

 

Founded in 1970 to help promote foreign trade, the Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA) is the foremost non-profit trade promotion organization in Taiwan. Jointly sponsored by the government, industry associations, and several commercial organizations, TAITRA assists Taiwan businesses and manufacturers with reinforcing their international competitiveness and in coping with the challenges they face in foreign markets.

 

TAITRA boasts a well-coordinated trade promotion and information network of over 600 trained specialists stationed throughout its Taipei headquarters, four local branch offices in Hsinchu, Taichung, Tainan and Kaohsiung, and over 48 overseas branch offices worldwide. TAITRA’s Service Industry Promotion Center was inaugurated in July 2006 to facilitate the globalization of Taiwan’s burgeoning service industry.



Medical Tourism in Taiwan


September 30th, 2009 by Formosa Medical Travel

At Formosa Medical Travel, we work on behalf of patients seeking affordable knee and hip replacement surgery abroad, connecting them with a network of world-class hospitals located in Taiwan. These facilities provide outstanding medical care while offering patients significant savings. We book patients’ surgery, transfer medical records, assist in finding flights and hotels, and provide concierge services to patients in Taiwan. There is no charge for our services.


With medical teams that speak fluent English and are trained and educated in the United States, American patients can have confidence that the quality of healthcare they will receive in Taiwan will meet or exceed that of the United States – at a fraction of the cost.


Formosa Medical Travel specializes in facilitating knee and hip replacement surgery, and nothing else. Since this is our only focus, we are able to provide our patients with a level of service for joint replacement surgery that is unparalleled in medical travel.


Unlike most medical travel facilitators, we do not offer a wide variety of procedures in a dozen different places. We operate in Taiwan, a modern, developed country, and we have close relationships with our network of hospitals and doctors.


Formosa Medical Travel works hard to ensure a comfortable and rewarding medical trip to Taiwan. We make traveling for medical care safe, easy, and affordable. After you get in touch with us via e-mail or phone, we will provide you with the information and guidance you need to choose a hospital and doctor. Then, we’ll assist you in requesting your surgery, transferring medical information, obtaining an evaluation from your medical team, booking an initial consultation, and scheduling your surgery. We will help you book your flight and hotel. When you arrive in Taiwan, we’ll be waiting for you at the airport. All necessary transportation will be arranged. We’ll take care of all the details – from your arrival to your departure.






New! Medical Tourism Video



 

 

 

 

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